1-Ski Quivers: Reviewers’ Selections (19/20)

Intro

Over the past week, we’ve published our reviewers’ selections for 5-ski4-ski3-ski, and 2-ski quivers. Now it’s time for the most difficult decision of them all: picking a single ski to use for absolutely everything.

To be clear, there is no single perfect quiver for everyone. It all depends very much on where you ski and how you ski. So our selections below shouldn’t be viewed as our answer to the question, “What are the best skis out there?” Instead, these are our personal picks, and our rationale for why we’d choose them. As always, we’re interested to hear what you’d pick for your own 1-ski quiver, so let us know in the Comments section at the bottom.

More Ski-Quiver Help

For more general suggestions — as opposed to what we personally would pick — check out our 19/20 Buyer’s Guide.

And if you’d like to get our recommendations for assembling your own ski quiver, then become a Blister Member, send us an email, and we’ll remove the guesswork.

Six Questions

For each of our reviewers, we asked them to answer the following questions:

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?
II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 1-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?
III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?
IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?
V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?
VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

The Selections

  • Luke Koppa
  • Kristin Sinnott
  • Sam Shaheen
  • Cy Whitling
  • Eric Freson
  • Kara Williard
  • Sascha Anastas
  • Paul Forward
  • Jonathan Ellsworth
  • (we’ll be adding Joey Teahan & Scott Nelson’s selections ASAP)
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Review Navigation:  Luke Koppa //  Kristin Sinnott //  Sam Shaheen //  Cy Whitling //  Eric Freson //  Kara Williard //  Sascha Anastas //  Paul Forward //  Jonathan Ellsworth

Luke Koppa

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?

Oh boy. This one is tough, as it should be. For a true 1-ski quiver, I need something that isn’t so heavy that I am miserable during longer days in the backcountry, but not so light that I’m significantly held back in the resort. That’s a lot to ask of one setup, but here’s my take:

Romp 100, 183 cm + CAST Freetour System

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

So this answer is kinda cheating, since this is a ski that was custom built for me by Romp. But of all the skis I’ve used, I can’t think of one that would perform better across all conditions, and have the blend of low weight and suspension to make me comfortable taking it out for bigger days in the backcountry and for lap after lap of inbounds skiing. This ski carves well, it floats well enough for pretty deep days, and with the rocker profile and mount point I selected, it’s playful enough to take through the park.

As for bindings, I could do inserts for alpine bindings and something like the ATK Raider 2.0 12 or Fritschi Tecton, but I’m going to stick with the CAST system. I’ve used inserts in the past, and having to take off / put on my bindings every time I switch from the resort and backcountry is kind of a pain (I know, I’m lazy).

I also currently spend more time in the resort than in the backcountry (roughly 70/30 or 80/20 split), and if I spent more time in the backcountry I think I might do inserts (to have a lighter backcountry binding for longer days) or just go with something like the Shift or Tecton. I think the Shift is a phenomenal piece of equipment, but for hucking tricks in the resort, I think the all-metal CAST system would give me more peace of mind. And it’s really nice to ski alpine bindings wherever you ski, since skiing in tech bindings always requires a bit of adjustment for me when coming from bashing inbounds laps on alpine bindings. So that’s another reason I’d opt for CAST over inserts.

Bonus Question: Non-Custom Ski

If I was picking from non-custom skis, it’s a tougher choice. While the logical part of me wants to pick the 186 cm Line Sick Day 104 (one of the best 50/50 skis I’ve ever used), I’m going to go for the much more playful 184 cm Line Sir Francis Bacon.

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

To me, a true, 50/50, 1-ski quiver is about realizing that you’re not going to have the perfect ski for some (or most) days. If that’s the case, then I at least want something that’s really fun, even when I’m not using it in that particular ski’s ideal conditions.

The SD 104 is the more versatile ski, in that it performs quite well in most conditions and you can ski it pretty traditionally or a bit more centered / neutral with the bindings moved forward a few cm. While the SFB isn’t as damp or stable on firm conditions, I can still have a lot of fun on it by dialing back my speed. Unlike some light and / or soft skis, I wouldn’t call the SFB “scary” or “unpredictable” in less-than-ideal conditions. Instead, its lack of stability and extremely playful design encourage me to slow down, find more side hits, transitions, etc. — its predictability and extremely playful nature make that skiing style a lot of fun. Choosing the SFB over the SD 104 would limit the ways I can ski (i.e., I could ski faster and with a more directional style on the SD 104), but as of right now, I think I’d rather have a more playful and less stable ski if I only get one.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 1-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Man, I’m really tempted to go with the Rossignol Black Ops 118, but unfortunately, the logical part of my brain is telling me no. And this time, Logical Luke is winning, and he’d go with:

Fischer Ranger 102 FR, 184 cm + Salomon STH2 13

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

As I noted in my 2-ski-quiver selections, this ski isn’t the most playful or the most stable, but it’s really good at combining both of those aspects. It’s damp and strong enough to be fun to ski fast (way faster than the SFB), yet its swing weight is low enough, it has enough rocker, and I can ski it centered enough that it doesn’t feel totally out of place in the park or when trying to throw tricks around the mountain. It holds an edge really well for its width, and it floats well enough that I’d still have a blast on pow days.

I’ve been spoiled when it comes to picking from a massive quiver of skis, but for a single ski to use for all resort conditions at Crested Butte Mountain Resort, the Ranger 102 FR would work well. All that said, this is probably the quiver with the best chance of getting changed next year, since there are a lot of skis that could work for me.

III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?

Line Vision 108, 183 cm + Fritschi Tecton

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I’m tempted to go narrower and lighter with this ski & binding setup, but since I ski pretty conservatively on big days and I can always get in better shape and make a heavier setup work for those days, I’m opting for the fairly wide Vision 108 and fairly heavy Tecton. If I’m only going to be touring, that means I’m going to be spending a lot of my days searching for good snow mid-winter, and the Vision 108 is perfect for that. It’s not ideal for super firm conditions, but it’ll get me down them. And I really need my single backcountry ski to be playful for my skiing style, which makes the Vision 108 an easy choice of the skis I’ve used. As for bindings, I’d opt for the better power transfer (and potentially safer release characteristics) of the Tecton since I’d want that for mid-winter days and can deal with a heavier binding in the spring and summer.

IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I don’t think I’m going to change from my first 1-ski quiver. If I can go custom, I’d go with the Romp 100. It’s just a really versatile shape, and with the build I ended up with, it’d serve me well for basically any sort of inbounds or backcountry skiing. And Romp’s build seems pretty burly (I know several people here in CB who have been skiing one pair of Romps for many years).

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

If I had to go with stock skis, I’d still stick with the Line Sir Francis Bacon. It’s fun on smooth firm snow, it’s crazy fun in soft snow, and while it’s not very stable, I’m not going to have a bad time on it in almost any condition since it’s so fun at slower speeds. Notice a theme? This ski is just fun.

V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?

Like, a zillion skis.

The Line Sick Day 104 was extremely close to replacing the Sir Francis Bacon. The SD 104 is more stable and arguably more versatile than the SFB, and I would be totally content with it as my do-everything 1-ski quiver. The SFB is just so much more playful, and as of right now, I’m willing to give up some stability and versatility in exchange for more playfulness.

I think the Moment Deathwish has a really good chance of taking the place of the SFB (or maybe even the Ranger 102 FR?). The Deathwish is far more stable than the SFB, and my main question is how much less playful it’ll feel compared to the SFB. My initial thought is “not an extreme amount,” which makes a very strong case for the Deathwish. After my brief time on it so far, the Deathwish seems like one of the best options for a wider 1-ski quiver that is light enough for touring.

The Liberty Origin 96 is also a very strong candidate for the 50/50, do-everything, 1-ski quiver. But same as the SD 104, I’m opting to go with something a bit more playful.

For my resort-only quiver, there are so many skis that could work. I could be happy on the Dynastar Menace 98 as a narrower option, the Nordica Enforcer Free 104 is a more damp, less playful alternative to the Ranger 102 FR, and I don’t think I’d mind a wider option like the ON3P Woodsman 108, Icelantic Nomad 105, Prior Northwest 110, or Folsom Primary.

For my touring ski, there are lots of more directional options that could work, such as the Black Diamond Helio 105. But I know I’m going to end up building some jumps and hucking my carcass off them, which means I want a more playful ski with a more forward mount point and more rocker.

VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

For my true do-everything ski, I think the Moment Deathwish, Moment Wildcat 108, WNDR Alpine Intention 110, and Moment PB&J all make strong cases on paper. They’re all roughly in the right weight range for a 50/50 ski for me, and they all seem like they’ll be playful and stable enough for me.

For my resort-only ski, the Shaggy’s Ahmeek 105, ON3P Woodsman 108 (or 96?), and Prior Northwest 110 all seem like good options. I haven’t yet skied the Ahmeek 105, so that’s purely a guess. The only remaining question I have with the Woodsman 108 is its firm-snow performance, while I want to ski the Northwest 110 with a new tune to see how well it can balance edge hold with a loose, surfy feel.

And if we’re totally speculating, I’m really curious about some skis that don’t yet exist. K2 should be revamping their freestyle skis, and if they come out with more freestyle-friendly versions of the Mindbenders, well, they’d be high on my list of potential 1-ski resort quivers.

Then I really, really want Rossignol to make a narrower Black Ops 118. If they could make a ski that offered a very similar blend of stability and playfulness to that ski, but in a more sensible width for everyday use, I could probably just stop testing skis (just kidding).

On that note, a narrower Volkl Revolt 121 could be really, really cool.

As for touring skis, the Moment Wildcat Tour 108 seems like it has the best chance of unseating the Vision 108. The Wildcat Tour 108, on paper, seems like everything I want in a touring ski. And so does the Deathwish Tour

Kristin Sinnott

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?

Unsurprisingly, narrowing a quiver of skis down to one pair is difficult, especially this year when we were allowed to start with five. For me, the ideal 1-ski quiver would be around 100 mm wide in the waist. I primarily ski Taos, but I do venture east and north on occasion, and 100 isn’t so wide that I feel ridiculous skiing it on days where the snow is neither deep nor soft. It’s also not so narrow that I would dread the big dumps — or more likely, dread my ski choice on big powder days. For me, it’s a toss up between the Armada Trace 98 and the DPS Zelda A106.

Since I also split my time between the backcountry and the resort, the ski I chose would have to handle both. With that in mind, I’d mount the skis with the Marker Kingpin or Salomon Shift MNC, as I feel comfortable skiing in the resort with them and they’re not so heavy as to impede my uphill motivation.

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

For the ski … I’m going with the 172 cm Armada Trace 98. Even while writing this I’m a little hesitant since it is a very light ski, but it doesn’t get bounced around as much as I would have thought. There would be some frustrating firm firm days when the tips would chatter and I’d have to slow myself down every run, but I think for the majority of days, I’d be happy on these. I know they work well for backcountry as they have been my 1-touring-ski quiver for the past few seasons.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 1-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

These quiver reviews really have me jonesing to get on more 100mm-wide skis, especially the Nordica Santa Ana 100. I should finally be getting on it this year, and I think it would be a heavy favorite for this question. So with that said, and based on the relatively small number of ~100mm-wide skis I’ve recently been on, I’m going to stick with the Trace 98 for my inbounds-only ski. It’s lighter than I’d like for firm days, but it’s a very versatile ski and I could adapt. And my goal for this season is to jump on more skis with 100 mm waists to see if and how this quiver would change.

III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Same answer — Trace 98, 172 cm. But I’d throw a lighter AT binding on it (probably G3 ZED or ION, or something in our Lightweight Touring Binding Shootout).

IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Hard question, but if I base it on the past 3 years, then I think I’ll stick with the Trace 98. I’ve skied it back east and all over CO and NM and haven’t had any issues. It’s held up well and I don’t foresee it not lasting another 3 years.

V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?

The Nordica Santa Ana 93. It’s a great ski for the majority of days at Taos as it holds its edge through some of the firmest conditions while maintaining a bit of playfulness. Ultimately, I just can’t wrap my head around not having a ski wider than 93 mm underfoot, which is why I opted for the Trace 98.

VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

The 169 cm Nordica Santa Ana 100 seems like a great option for a inbounds-only ski. I know Kara is down with throwing AT bindings on her Santa Ana’s, but I still wouldn’t want a touring setup that’s that heavy.

I’d also like to try some more skis in the 100 mm waist range. The Moment Sierra, DPS Yvette 100 RP, and Black Crows Navis Freebird are all on my radar.

Sam Shaheen

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?

One ski for all the skiing that I do will have to do A LOT of different things — firm early season groomers on man-made snow, zipper-line bumps, funky steep terrain / moguls, wide-open bowls, (usually small) cliff drops, moderate to very deep powder days (and the ensuing chop), 5000-10000’ powder-touring days, 5000-10000’ ski-mountaineering days, rock-hard snow in 50°+ no-fall terrain, and pretty much every other snow condition imaginable.

That’s a tall order for any ski to handle and there are definitely going to be some big compromises. But I’m pretty happy with this setup:

Elan Ripstick 106, 181 cm + inserts for Salomon Shift MNC & ATK Raider 2.0 12

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

The Ripstick 106 is a very versatile ski. It is quite lightweight and super energetic. It’s quick enough for the tightest terrain and it can hold an edge pretty well for its width. It feels a lot like a lighter Rossignol Soul 7 HD, and if you know me, you know that’s high praise. It is forgiving enough that I can ski it lazily and it won’t kick my ass when the consequences are high. And yet, it’s still strong enough to ski pretty hard and not fold on me at fairly high speeds.

And yeah, I cheated and put inserts in for two bindings. But it’s not really cheating because, if I really had to only ski one ski for the whole year, I’d definitely drill them for a lightweight binding for the big days. The Raider is such a confidence-inspiring clamp and it shaves over 500 grams off of each foot vs. the Shift. Easy decision. Most days I’d leave the Shift on, but for the big days in the backcountry, the ATK gets the nod for sure.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 1-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Easy — 188 cm Rossignol Soul 7 HD. Do you really want me to talk about this ski anymore, or can we just move on? If you do, see our full review for the full story.

III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?

This is a great question because I feel that it is very applicable to a lot of backcountry skiers. Between expensive bindings, a second set of boots, avy gear, skins, and all the other stuff, backcountry skiing is a very expensive activity. And so for many people, it makes sense to just have one backcountry setup.

I often go out with new backcountry skiers who have spent thousands of dollars on a brand-new setup and they’ve made a very questionable decision on the ski. My advice for your first backcountry setup? Don’t go with something flashy. By that, I mean not the lightest, not the widest, not the “coolest” — middle-of-the-road is often your friend, at least for your first skis. Backcountry skiing is hard enough — get a ski that is going to help you out as much as possible.

Anyway, end rant. And after having said all that, I’m not really going to follow my own advice. But this ski was so surprising and impressive to me that I’m going to give myself a small free-pass on my own rules, particularly because I’ve been able to try a lot of skis in this class (my choice would definitely change if this was my first backcountry ski).

Dynastar Mythic 97 Pro, 184 cm + ATK Raider 2.0 12

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This ski isn’t really all that middle-of-the-road — it is quite stiff and it has an extremely tapered shape with a huge amount of tip splay. But turns out, that combination works really well for me and the backcountry skiing I do. Its stiff platform means that this ski holds a strong and predictable edge on firm snow. The taper makes this ski much more forgiving than its flex pattern might have you believe. And the Mythic 97’s extremely high tip splay means that this ski floats far better than most skis with a 97 mm waist.

I think this is a geat 1-ski quiver for an advanced or expert backcountry skier who wants to slash pow and bag peaks, all on one ski.

IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I’m going to stick with the Ripstick 106. Regardless of where I am, I’ll probably be touring a lot and skiing whatever resort is around. I think the Ripstick will be ok. If I end up spending most of my time in a place like the US East Coast, with consistently firm conditions, I’d be wishing for a narrower ski. But I think the Ripstick 106 would do pretty well.

V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?

The Line Sick Day 104 is always hard to leave off the 1-ski quiver. But I went with the Ripstick 106 because it’s a bit more energetic and better matches with my skiing style (because it’s a bit more precise and poppy).

The Rossignol Soul 7 HD was hard to leave off my do-everything selection, but it’s just too heavy for how much touring I do.

For the touring 1-ski quiver, the 179 cm K2 Wayback 106 is a great ski that I think a lot of people will get along with. It just isn’t quite strong enough to inspire confidence on super steep lines in extremely crappy snow for me to choose it.

The G3 SENDr 112 is also a great ski that could have made the overall 1-ski or the touring-only 1-ski. I find that ski to be really fun because of how hard you can ski it, but it’s just a bit too game-on for me to want to ski it 100 days in a row.

VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

I think the Black Diamond Helio 105 could be a very good option for a 1-touring-ski quiver.

And them I’m also curious about the Moment Deathwish Tour, since Cy has loved that ski as a 1-touring-ski quiver, and his touring season tends to look a lot like mine (pow-hunting & long spring days).

Cy Whitling

Cy Whitling

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?

Moment Deathwish, 184 cm + inserts for Fritschi Vipec Evo & Look Pivot 14

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

It’s really good (see all my other quiver selections for more).

III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?

Moment Deathwish Tour, 184 cm + Fritschi Vipec Evo

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This is the most contested answer for me. out of all these articles. I really like the Deathwish Tour. But if I was only skiing in the backcountry, I also could be totally fine on the regular Deathwish, or the Atomic Bent Chetler 120 for more of a soft-snow focus.

IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Same as my first quiver: 184 cm Moment Deathwish with inserts for the Fritschi Vipec Evo and Look Pivot 14.

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?

Moment Deathwish Tour for the do-everything ski, just cause I like it so much and it’d be easier on the up if I end up doing much more touring than resort skiing. But I’m not at all upset about choosing the standard Deathwish

VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

Am I building up the potential of the new K2 freestyle line too much in my head? Maybe? If they were really good they could give the Deathwish a run for its money. Same goes for Atomic if they ever get around to making a Bent Chetler 110. Bring back the Blog, Atomic!

Eric Freson

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?

18/19 Faction Prime 4.0, 185 cm + CAST Freetour System

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Before improvements in touring equipment, I was the guy you saw out there happily (sometimes) logging miles in alpine boots, race-stock bindings, and Alpine Trekkers. If I only have one setup, I want it to do everything I need it to, particularly in terms of skiing aggressively.

In my experience, the 18/19 Faction Prime 4.0 is charger … at least for a ski this light (we haven’t skied the revised 19/20 version). Its 26-meter sidecut radius, powerful flex throughout, and relative light weight help to make the Prime 4.0 stand out for me as a quiver of one in both the backcountry and in the resort. The confidence it provides me in variable snow is impressive, float in soft snow is somewhere between good to great, and it can hang while hammering into stuff all day at a resort. I think its multi-radius sidecut helps it perform well at slower speeds and mellower terrain, while still being comfortable in bigger turns. I think it’s a great tool for high speeds, high-consequence lines, and any time I only own one pair of skis. All that said, I know Paul Forward had a pretty different experience on the Prime 4.0, but this is my take after spending a good chunk of time on it (and messing with the tune).

And if I’m going to be skiing it at the resort a bunch, I want a beefy binding. While the Look Pivot isn’t my first choice for resort bindings, it’s still an excellent binding. Other than too much elasticity in firm conditions for my taste, I’d have no complaints. Plus, you can get them in orange…

In the backcountry there is no denying that the CAST system can be slow and tedious to transition, and bulky, and it’s pretty heavy … but it gives me a tech toe on the way up and a legit alpine binding on the way down. Glorious.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 1-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blizzard Bodacious, 186 cm + Salomon STH2 16

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Easy — I’ll stick with the Bodacious. No speed limit, heavy, damp, and fast. It does well on piste for what it is — the Bodacious doesn’t feel like a ski that’s 118 mm underfoot, meaning I don’t feel penalized by its wide waist when things aren’t especially soft or deep, or on the way back to the chairlift. It’s incredibly fun on chalky snow and it demolishes anything approaching soft snow. It’s a very heavy, stiff, and demanding ski, but that’s part of what makes it so much fun for me. For the skiing I do, I think it’s hard to think of a ski that’s more fun in the resort when conditions are anything other than boilerplate.

III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?

4FRNT Hoji, 187 cm + Marker Kingpin

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

The 4FRNT Raven, even in the 190 cm size, is too small for a 1-touring-ski quiver for me. Its lighter weight and narrower waist give up too much for me on the days when the snow is good or I want to go very fast on the down. Pushed really hard in really steep or deep conditions, I can outride it fairly quickly. Similarly, the 4FRNT Renegade gives up too much for me on the longer days or those when conditions aren’t very good. On days with lots of mileage and vert and / or firm snow, the Renegade is just less sensible.

The Hoji provides a happy middle ground between the two. It does better in soft snow, high speeds, and bigger lines than the Raven, but is a bit better on firm snow and isn’t quite as heavy and cumbersome as the Renegade. The Hoji is a pretty comprehensive mashup of the character of the Raven and Renegade. After some major back and forth, I think I’d go with the 187 cm over the 195 cm to help keep it a bit lighter and more agile. Overall, I’m always going to be looking for soft snow, and the Hoji excels there while still doing well enough when things get firm and sketchy for me to commit to it as my only backcountry ski.

In this scenario, I’m going to switch it up a bit and go with the Marker Kingpin over the Dynafit ST Rotation 12. I’m still looking for good touring and transition efficiency, but the Kingping’s heel gives me a bit better firm-snow performance over the Dynafit, which will be useful if I’m going to be skiing something that’s 112 mm underfoot everywhere and in all conditions.

IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

If I was going to throw a single pair of skis in the truck and drive for the next three years, didn’t know where I would be headed, and didn’t know what I would encounter, it would be the 188 cm Salomon QST 106 with CAST Freetour system. That would cover me anywhere. I could rail corduroy on the US East Coast, use it as an everyday driver in the Intermountain West, smash mashed potatoes on the West Coast, and go real fast with almost no stress in AK. Your legs can always get stronger. Done and done.

V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?

The 4FRNT Raven. It’s just so darn intuitive, versatile, and functional. It’s the choice a realist would probably make for their quiver of one. In the end, its lighter weight and more forgiving flex pattern comes as too much of a compromise to be my only ski for everything.

The Faction Dictator 3.0 was also a major contender for my 1-ski quiver for the next three years. I’m one of the Blister reviewers who really likes the Dictator series. It’s just much more demanding and a bit less versatile than the Salomon QST 106.

VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

The Armada ARG II. I used the original in tons of places and conditions for which they were never designed, but always had a big smile when they were on my feet. Most enjoyable powder ski I have ever spent time on. Skied them from CO to AK with Salomon SLab 916’s and Alpine Trekkers. Maybe it’s time to go back to that setup (possibly the heaviest touring setup ever mentioned on Blister?).

Kara Williard

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?

As I have relayed throughout these quiver articles, I ski mostly inbounds at Taos Ski Valley, with 20-30% of my time being spent in the backcountry in an assortment of conditions and locations. My one and only ski needs to be something stable enough for firm days on challenging terrain (as is common in Taos), while still functioning on deep days and offering good versatility for the huge range of backcountry conditions.

Narrowing it down to one ski doesn’t seem nearly as hard this year as it has in years past. I was able to try many lighter skis this past season, many of which still handle inbounds conditions well, which made me worry less about compromising in the resort or in the backcountry.

K2 Mindbender 106c Alliance, 175 cm + Salomon Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This was a fairly easy pick since I spent a lot of days on this ski last season in a massive range of conditions. This ski is quick and nimble enough for long bump runs at Taos and narrow chutes, while still being damp and stable for its weight. At 106 mm underfoot, this is a very good option for most of Taos’s powder days, yet it still holds an edge well on groomers and firmer / chalkier snow. I like that this ski is slightly more forgiving than what I have picked previously (177 cm Nordica Santa Ana 110 for last year’s 1-ski quiver), which is a bit more reassuring when the conditions are slightly more punishing, or the legs are tired. However, I am still very impressed by the performance of this ski (it’s not some super light, super soft noodle), and feel like I could happily take it with me to pretty much anywhere.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 1-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I wouldn’t change a thing. Except for the binding (Look Pivot 14).

III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I think I’d be happy on the Mindbender 106c, but I think the 172 cm Blizzard Sheeva 10 makes a very strong case for this spot. While it is only a tiny bit lighter than the 175 cm Mindbender 106c, the 172 cm Sheeva 10 feels like less ski because of its shorter length and more dramatic rocker profile. Backcountry-only skiing could mean anything from New Mexico and Colorado to Japan or AK (and who knows where in between, I’ve got some trips in mind!), so I would want to stick with something somewhat forgiving and incredibly reliable — two things that the Sheeva 10 has proven again and again during my time on it.

IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I think with the versatility that the K2 Mindbender 106c Alliance offers, I wouldn’t change my choice. It’s a ski that rarely feels out of place, and I love that it doesn’t give up too much stability and damping on firm snow while being much quicker than many of the metal-laminate skis I’ve been on in the past. I think I’d be happy with it just about anywhere.

V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?

I almost swapped the Mindbender 106c with the 179 cm Nordica Enforcer Free 104. The Enforcer 104 is another really versatile ski that can handle super firm, unforgiving snow while not being a chore in deeper and softer conditions.

Likewise, I was close to picking the 174 cm Salomon QST Stella 106, and will need to spend more time on it to really figure out how it compares to the Mindbender 106c. There are a lot of good potential skis for the 1-ski quiver these days, and now I am also thinking back to the many phenomenal days I’ve spent on the Blizzard Sheeva 10, which is another versatile contender. The Sheeva 10 is the most forgiving of the options I looked at, and for a true do-everything ski, I prefer the stronger firm-snow performance of the Mindbender 106c.

VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

I am really curious to explore Sascha’s go-to, the Line Pandora 104, but in a longer length (172 cm). I also want to spend some time on the Rossignol Soul 7 HD W to see where it falls in the category of potential 1-ski quivers.

Sascha Anastas

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?

Line Pandora 104, 165 cm + Salomon Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

My answer here is a bit redundant after my other quiver selections, but I am still pretty sure I can’t live without the Line Pandora 104. I spend most of my time skiing resorts in Colorado, in a wide variety of snow conditions, and most often on steeper slopes, and I have yet to ski a ski that can perform so well across the board. The Pandora 104 can carve turns on piste, charge on steep terrain, and is plenty nimble in moguls, especially for how wide it is. And as a smaller gal, I have no problem keeping this ski afloat in powder up to around 10”.

If this were truly the only ski I was able to have in my quiver, I would definitely mount the ski with a touring binding that had an alpine heel, such as the Salomon Shift. I know touring bindings have made leaps and bounds over the past few years in terms of both uphill and downhill performance, but as a former racer, I would definitely choose a binding that is more downhill oriented and one that offers downhill performance similar to alpine bindings, particularly because most of my days are spent in the resort.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 1-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

The 168 cm K2 Mindbender 98Ti Alliance is the ski that’d come closest to replacing the Pandora 104, but it would be hard to commit to a ski under 100 mm for a 1-ski quiver since I would like to be aptly prepared for deeper conditions. The Pandora 104 is also more playful and more nimble than the Mindbender, so I think I would still ultimately choose the Pandora 104 as it is overall a bit more well rounded. And in this case, I’d put some alpine bindings on the Pandora 104, most likely the Marker Griffon.

III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I think that my answer would still be the Line Pandora 104 since it’s quite light already (~1635 g per ski for the 165 cm) and I love how it skis. While I have primarily skied this ski inbounds, it has performed really well in everything from technical, steep runs to mellow cruiser laps, so I am confident the ski would be able to handle the backcountry terrain I like to ski.

IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I can’t really imagine the Pandora 104 being ousted by any ski on the market at this time. I have no problems committing to this ski for the next three years (I’ve already been using it for the past two years with no issue).

V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?

As long as I have the Pandora 104 in my quiver, I feel like I am prepared for all conditions. That said, it was a close call with the K2 Mindbender 98Ti Alliance for my inbounds-only ski.

VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

Liberty Genesis 106

I was quite impressed by the Liberty Genesis 90 and 96 (both the 18/19 and 19/20 versions), but have yet to get on the Genesis 106. The narrower Genesis skis offering a good balance of playfulness and stability; they were easy to get on edge, fun to pop out of laid-over turns, but were stable, stiff underfoot, and quick to respond to inputs. Given my experience on those skis, I think that the Genesis 106 could be a good candidate to replace the Pandora 104.

Rossignol Soul 7 HD W

With a measured width of 104.5 mm, very tapered shape, lots of tip rocker, and a fairly low weight, this ski looks intriguing to me. Specifically, it has a lot of tip splay which should make it easy to keep afloat powder, even for its moderately wide width of 104 mm. It also is pretty stiff in the middle of the ski with softer tips and tails, and its flex pattern is fairly similar to the Genesis 96 and Genesis 90’s flex patterns. Based on what Sam has said about the unisex Soul 7 HD and the similarities the Soul 7 HD W shares with some of my favorite skis, it seems like it could make for a good 1-ski quiver.

Paul Forward

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?

Moment Wildcat Tour, 190 cm + Salomon Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I’m a little nervous about the Shift because I’ve never skied it, but it seems like the best bet for a true 1-ski quiver. The Wildcat Tour, however, is easy to live with no matter what I’m doing. I’d often wish it was skinnier or lighter or heavier or fatter, but it would get me through a winter here in Alaska.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 1-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Moment Blister Pro (OG heavy version), 190 cm + Salomon STH2 16 or Marker Jester

Blister Gear Review's 3-Ski Quiver awards

I could spend a whole winter at Alyeska on my Moment Blister Pro without too much complaint. I’d be tempted to pick something skinnier, but my whole winter is focused on pow skiing and I’d hate to feel under-gunned when Alyeska’s north face opens.

III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?

Black Diamond Helio 116, 186 cm + Dynafit Superlite 2.0 or possibly G3 ZED

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I mostly tour for powder and this ski is light and reliable in all conditions but still fun on big lines and in deep snow. The Superlite 2.0 is a great binding that has served me well and really keeps the weight down, but I’d be tempted to swap to something with a bit more elastic travel in the heel if I was using it all season in all conditions.

IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This is a tough one. If I didn’t know where in the world I’d be, my ideal ski would probably be ~105 mm underfoot, decent in pow, hold a strong edge, and still come in less than 1900 grams in ~190 cm length so I could tour on it. The DPS Wailer A106 would be okay, but it’s not amazing. I’m still on the hunt for the right ski to fit these criteria.

V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?

I’d be bummed to face an Alaskan winter or pow chasing and heli guiding with nothing over 120 mm underfoot. I’ve had a 120mm+ ski in my quiver since around 2005, and right now, the DPS Alchemist Lotus 124 is probably the fat ski I’d be most upset about not having in my quiver.

VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

Sam and Cy sure seem stoked on that Atomic Bent Chetler 120. I’m a bit heavier and we all ski differently, but it sounds like a ski that is light enough for touring, decent in variable, and still fun in deep pow. I’d love to try a pair of the 192 cm version.

Jonathan Ellsworth

I. What’s your 1-ski quiver for where you ski most (backcountry and resort)?

Given that I am currently spending most of my 100+ days a year skiing inbounds, I’m going with a heavier setup that will work well in the resort. This setup will also be very capable when it’s time to head downhill on backcountry tours, but I will be working with a weight penalty on the way up — which is the compromise here that I am most willing to live with. And so, the contenders for me are…

Nordica Enforcer Free 104, 186 cm + Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

And for skiing a ton of days at Crested Butte … I’m going to go with the heavier Enforcer Free 104.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 1-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

I’ve been going back and forth between the Nordica Enforcer 104 and the Fischer Ranger 102 for way, way too long now to answer this question. And honestly, while I still hate the idea of having to ski 100+ days and all terrain — inbounds and out — on a single setup … given the many inherent compromises here … I think I could be quite happy on either of these setups.

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

But if / when I’ll be doing more than 80% of my ski days inbounds, I’ll opt for the heavier Enforcer 104 Free.

III. If you only skied in the backcountry, what would your 1-ski quiver be for backcountry-only skiing?

4FRNT Raven, 184 cm + Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I’ve just had too many good days and years on it to say anything else here.

(That said, Eric Freson’s answer really underscores that I do need to ski the current 4FRNT Hoji. I haven’t skied that ski since it first came out … and I was not a huge fan of it back in 2012. But that’s when it was being pushed hard as an everyday inbounds ski. No way would that 1st-gen Hoji be my everyday inbounds ski, but I am very curious to see what I’d think of the current iteration of the ski as my all-purpose touring ski.)

IV. What’s your 1-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

This year, this feels like a very tough question. The candidates are the 186 cm Nordica Enforcer Free 104, the 184 cm Fischer Ranger 102 FR, or the 188 cm Salomon QST 106.

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

And … somewhat arbitrarily (see the next section) … I’m going to go with the Nordica Enforcer Free 104.

V. What ski was the most difficult to leave off your list?

No other ski that I haven’t already mentioned. For me, the bigger issue is whether I’ve made the right call among the Nordica Enforcer Free 104, Fischer Ranger 102 FR, and Salomon QST 106.

All three skis operate within the same category, they just excel at slightly different things. The Ranger 102 will be the quickest and the lightest on the skin track. The QST 106 will be best in deep pow. But the Enforcer 104 feels a little bit like the love child of the Ranger 102 and the QST 106 … so I’m going with it.

(But I feel like I wouldn’t be able to look the Fischer Ranger 102 in the eye right now. If I saw it, I’d have to stare at my shoes, pretend that I just remembered that I needed to be somewhere else, and slink away.)

VI. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

While I’m not confident that any ski will knock off my selections here, the ski that I think has the best chance at doing it is the 185 cm WNDR Alpine Intention 110. Shape-wise, width-wise, and weight-wise … while I still really respect WNDR’s clarity in calling this a backcountry ski and not a 50/50 ski … since you terrible people are making me select one setup … the Intention 110 could end up being that do-everything ski.

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34 comments on “1-Ski Quivers: Reviewers’ Selections (19/20)”

  1. Man oh man, this is the toughy. I don’t envy the review crew on this one. For people that have everyday access, this is obviously a hard choice. I don’t have everyday access as I’m a Franger that has to drive two hours when I want to slide. So the one-ski quiver interests me greatly. That said, no chance I’m owning one bike. But I do own one mountain bike and one drop bar bike. There’s a reason why that’s the absolute smallest my bike quiver can go. Because the two styles of riding they support are inherently VERY different. All that to say this…the one ski quiver for either resort only or touring only (rather than one-ski for all) may be the single most important gear question this site asks itself on a year over year basis.

    Think about it. How many people own a multi-ski quiver for the resort? I’d argue it’s less than we think. Getting a ski recommendation from the most reputable reviewing group in the outdoor community for the one ski I should be on at the resort (or in the backcountry) is perhaps the best thing I see here all year. Thanks.

  2. Great to read these as always. One thing that would be interesting to add is boot choices for selections that use binding inserts. I know boots are harder to recommend due to personal fit being so important, but it’d be interesting to see the rationale behind each choice.

    • Yo Sam – I get the sense that you are actually a pretty “decent” park skier and yet choose some of the most directional quivers (not just this quiver but also in general). I feel like these days many skiers wish they could throw spins and flips while (at least by quiver choice) you seem to have transcended that desire. Am I totally off base here? What happened?

    • Howdy,

      This is an open question but mostly aimed at Luke since he choosed SD/SFB . What is the difference between those skies and J skis Vacation?

      Thanks,

      Bob

      • I haven’t skied the Vacation so I can’t make a super accurate comparison, but some things jump out based on those skis’ specs and what Cy has said about the Vacation. First, the Vacation doesn’t seem very similar to the SD 104. The SD is a much more directional ski with a more rearward mount point, much less tail splay, and a less symmetrical flex pattern — all of which makes it better suited to directional skiers who like to drive the front of their skis and who don’t care much about spinning or skiing switch. The Vacation is also heavier than the SD 104, so I suspect the Vacation will feel notably more damp on firm snow. The SFB is more similar to the Vacation than the SD 104, but the SFB is still a lot lighter and has a very different shape. I suspect that the SFB’s much fatter tips will help it initiate carved turns much better, but it’s much lower weight will likely make it get knocked around much more than the Vacation. So I think the Vacation will be more stable than the Bacon, but not quite as easy to flick around and probably won’t carve quite as well (though it might be better on really roughed-up groomers).

  3. of all the magical things in life that fit under the heading, ” one is too many, two is not enough.” : bikes, cars, cats, beers, girlfriends… skiis might top the list ! but, the go-to must be given its due… y’all are awesome !

  4. My one ski quiver would also be the Fisher Ranger 102FR with pivots, it does everything well enough that I would be totally happy. I’m glad to see that it made it into one of the reviewers quivers.

    • At least for me, it was a very close call between the Shift and Cast system (we haven’t used the Duke PT yet, so we can’t include that right now). While I don’t have any reason to doubt the durability of the Shift (I haven’t had any issues with the pairs I’ve been using), I just have a bit more faith in the all-metal construction of the Cast system for a binding that I’d be bashing around in the resort for 100+ days a year (especially for my “1-ski quiver for the next 3 years”). And then since I currently spend more time in the resort than the backcountry, I’d take that potential increased durability over low weight and efficiency for the skin track. Also, I just really like having a high climbing riser, which the Shift lacks.

  5. As someone who is big on charging I really appreciate Eric’s view being added to the list. I ski in Prime 3.0’s and while I’m starting to feel a little underpowered on resort they handle so many variables so well when fine ‘race’ tuned.

    Also excited to see the Dictator on his list. I demo’d the 2020 3.0 among a stack of other skis last year and they provided some supreme confidence for skiing hard at high speeds.

  6. My apologies, I should’ve waited to comment until fearless leader chimed in. Jonathan represents the nearest to my own preference for burlier setups among the review crew. It’s so hard to be ruthlessly honest with how and where you ski. I think all of us think we are something different than we are. Just like in the mountain bike world, it seems more and more folks are willing to grind a huck wagon up the hill for the thrill going down. Ellsworth’s selection is the enduro pick of the list and I find his willingness to choose it as a one-ski quiver as for 50-50 or resort only to be refreshing.

    By the way, is anyone as surprised as I am to not see the Sick Day 104 among the choices?

    • Well Luke was pretty close to choosing them – not read all yet so maybe others too? I guess they have been around a few years now and either folks feel newer stuff moves the game on, or they stick to old favourites that have served them well (I’m talking to you Cy!) Not skied them but would love to given all the positive (one could say decently edgy) vibes that the Blister crew give out

  7. Well i pulled the trigger on my 2 ski quiver. SFB with an ATK 12, all excited!
    Then i just picked up a pr of 2020’s Deathwish skis. This will be my second pr. I’d like to mount them further back (i am definitely a bit more of a directional skier) how far from center can they be mounted and not Screw up the fun factor? I was thinking of 8-10 cm … a mistake? Likely to go with a kingpin. Luke? Anyone?

    • Where did you mount your old Deathwish, and did the mount point ever feel “off” on that first pair? Cause I think mounting back at -8 or -10 would make the ski feel pretty weird. I think the farthest I’d be comfortable going back would be -6 or -7 cm. I haven’t yet had the chance to play with the mount point, but I could still drive it basically as hard as I wanted when it was mounted on the line (admittedly, this was on pretty mellow early-season groomers). The ski does have a big sweet spot, but I’d be worried about how a very rearward mount would interact with the rocker profile, since the locations of the “micro camber” sections are based around that recommended mount point.

      • I’m still rocking and loving my 2011 181 Rossignol Sickles ..but they’re just about blown apart by now .. I’d appreciate a suggestion on a similar current ski to replace it !!
        Thanks in advance

      • Thanks, I was set at factory suggested (5cm??) I actually adjusted to them pretty well
        Would catch/ hit the tails sometimes in the trees
        Sounds like I’ll go with 6… I’m a big boy, I’ll get the hang of it!

    • Hey ST,

      I skied 181 Camox, mounted on the line (-6) for a few days in the past so I’ll give you some input. In comparison to what I’ve skied in the past this is a very quick turning/pivoting ski and to me feels like it’s even more center mounted than -6. It’s great in the trees and rips groomers, favoring medium radius turns, although it feels spring loaded so I kind of felt like I had to let it bounce around a bit and stay light on my feet. Despite feeling the need to stay very neutral it’s a blast on firm snow. Then, I got into ankle+ deep and became very underwhelmed. It does have some rocker, but I’d say it’s not good for much more than a couple inches of fresh snow as the tips just wanted to stay below the surface. I gave it a few days and determined it just doesn’t work for me. I had thought of remounting back, but I wasn’t confident that even -2 back would be enough. I went with the Origin 96 (original version) and so far I’m impressed. Powder is an entirely different experience than with the Camox and it feels pretty strong under foot. At 182 it’s a bit quicker/more playful than the reviews of the 187 sound, and I might be mounting it back another cm, we’ll see. The Origins are also very quick, but comfortable making longer turns. Vague initiation is the term I suppose, but I like being the one to dictate turn initiation more so than the ski at higher speed. Other than that I wish the Origins (1875g/ea) were the same weight as the Camox (2000g/ea). Camox conclusion: very quick, solid yet springy, nice weight, but not for deep snow, not a 1 ski quiver for CO. I’m about 5’9” and 155lbs. Hope this helps!

  8. As previously mentioned in earlier quivers, I have not skied so many different skis (yet, am playing catch up). Up until Sunday I would have said my one ski quiver would be the Nordica Enforcer 100, but then spent 3 days in Soelden this weekend and amongst others skied the Fischer Ranger 102 FR and just loved it, so think that would be my one and only now. Am not touring so resort only.

  9. Hey, I just picked up a pair of moment wildcat 108’s as my 1 ski (Colorado) quiver. Any thoughts on those? And how do they differ from the Solomon QST 106? I was on the fence. Also was looking at ON3P woodsman 108, that wasn’t mentioned either.

    Thanks for all your great reviews. You guys are killing my work productivity.

  10. Bought some enforcer 100’s before last season – Ranger 102’s were released the day after I had enforcers mounted. The second I saw them I knew I wanted them. Sold the enforcers on craigslist, 40+ days last season on Rangers and couldn’t be happier. Mounted +2, curious how they’d be on the line but whatever. Also happy I Phantom’ed them, stuffs great. Only wax in the spring when its REALLY warm. Love.My.Rangers.

  11. Greetings from Sydney, Australia all..Having just bought the highly acclaimed new Volkl Mantra M5, I’m more than a little surprised it doesn’t even rate a mention as a one ski quiver choice !? What am I missing here ? Thanks in advance. John.

    • john, i think the issue is the thin aussie snowpack. if you really skower the reviews, you will find alot of love for the M5.

      say hi to oz for me…

  12. john, i think the issue is the thin aussie snowpack. which might make the the M5 a natural choice down under… if you really skower the reviews, you will find alot of love for the M5.

    say hi to oz for me… been too long…

    • Interesting question, I know where you’re coming from as I am not skiing at this level, but I think as Jonathan says it’s one thing to be able to ski well it’s another to be able to write professionally about skis. I was at a ski test weekend last week and always capture some notes, but at best I could write a paragraph and even then am not able to capture the nuances of differences. So in summary, suspect this would be difficult to achieve! Be interested to hear other views

  13. Rereading my favorite ski-post of the year and I’ve got another question. Why so many CAST selections? Is there something I’m missing about the Shift’s release/elasticity/safety on the wya down?

    • I think Eric and I were the only ones who picked CAST this year, but at least for me, it comes down to CAST’s high riser (I know it’s a small thing, but I really like high risers) and long-term durability. To be clear, I have *not* had any durability issues with the Shift, but if I’m using a binding to mob around the resort for 100+ days a year, including tons of crashes, I personally have a bit more faith in the all-metal CAST system.

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