2-Ski Quivers: Reviewers’ Selections (19/20)

Intro

We recently published several of our reviewers’ selections for 5-ski4-ski, and 3-ski quivers and now we’re really getting to the hard decisions, asking them to trim those down to two skis.

To be clear, there is no single perfect quiver for everyone. It all depends very much on where you ski and how you ski. So our selections below shouldn’t be viewed as our answer to the question, “What are the best skis out there?” Instead, these are our personal picks, and our rationale for why we’d choose them. As always, we’re interested to hear what you’d pick for your own 2-ski quiver, so let us know in the Comments section at the bottom.

More Ski-Quiver Help

For more general suggestions — as opposed to what we personally would pick — check out our 19/20 Buyer’s Guide.

And if you’d like to get our recommendations for assembling your own ski quiver, then become a Blister Member, send us an email, and we’ll remove the guesswork.

Six Questions

For each of our reviewers, we asked them to answer the following questions:

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?
II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?
III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location? (We’re framing the question this way to emphasize (a) durability — these skis need to hold up for at least 3-4 years, and (b) versatility.)
IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?
V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?
VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

The Selections

  • Luke Koppa
  • Kristin Sinnott
  • Sam Shaheen
  • Kara Williard
  • Cy Whitling
  • Sascha Anastas
  • Eric Freson
  • Paul Forward
  • Joey Teahan
  • Jonathan Ellsworth
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Review Navigation:  Luke Koppa //  Kristin Sinnott //  Sam Shaheen //  Kara Williard //  Cy Whitling //  Sascha Anastas //  Eric Freson //  Paul Forward //  Joey Teahan //  Jonathan Ellsworth

Luke Koppa

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

As I’ve outlined in our other quiver articles, I spend a lot of my time skiing inbounds at Crested Butte Mountain Resort, and then get out for some mid-winter touring and lots of longer missions in the spring and summer. Right now, I spend enough time in the backcountry that I’d want a dedicated, lightweight touring setup that wouldn’t be burdensome on longer days. But then I also spend a lot of time in the resort, and so I’d want a very versatile inbounds ski that could handle everything from very firm to very deep conditions.

Ski #1: Do-Everything Touring Ski — Line Vision 108, 183 cm + Fritschi Tecton 12

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This ski just works really well for me. It’s super light for its size, so I don’t mind bringing it on bigger days. But it’s also very playful and I’d be pretty content using it for everything from booter sessions to pretty consequential lines. It won’t be the perfect ski for everything, but it’ll be able to handle just about anything.

Ski #2: Do-Everything Resort Ski — Fischer Ranger 102 FR, 184 cm + Salomon STH2 13

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This was a really, really tough call. There are a lot of skis that I could be pretty happy on for an entire resort season, but I think the Ranger 102 FR best fits my personal criteria. It’s damp and strong enough to ski very hard when conditions aren’t ideal, yet it has a low swing weight and skis well enough mounted around -6 cm from center that it doesn’t feel super one-dimensional and it’s still fairly comfortable throwing tricks. I was tempted to go with a much more playful option, and was also tempted to go with something more stable, but I think the Ranger 102 FR is the best middle-ground for me … at least for now.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Ski #1: Firm-Snow Ski — Dynastar Menace 98, 181 cm + Look Pivot 14

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

It was a tough call between this and the J Skis Masterblaster, but as I spend more and more time in the park, I think I’d rather lose a bit of stability in exchange for more playfulness. The Menace 98 is pretty damp, but it’s also very playful, and I’d be happy using it for everything from chalky Headwall laps to trips through the park.

Ski #2: Soft-Snow Ski — Icelantic Nomad 105, 191 cm + Salomon STH2 13

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This ski isn’t amazing at any one particular thing, but it does a lot of things very well. It’s wide enough (111 mm underfoot for the 191 cm length) and has enough rocker for very deep days, but its lack of taper means that it also carves quite well for its width. And at least in the 191 cm version, the Nomad 105 gives me a large and strong enough platform to ski quite hard in most conditions, while still having enough rocker and a soft-enough flex pattern to make it feel quite playful.

Bonus Quiver: I’m going to ignore the specifics of this question and consider a quiver for when I’m spending just a few days in the backcountry, rather than a large portion of my season. In that case, here’s what I’d pick:

Ski #1: 50/50 Soft-Snow Ski — Line Sir Francis Bacon, 184 cm + Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This ski is light enough that I’d be comfortable with it as my touring ski in this case (i.e., not touring that often). It also floats well enough that I’d be pretty happy with using it for pow days in the resort. And the real reason I picked it because it’s just so, so playful. I really like being able to switch up my skiing style depending on what ski I’m on (while many other people prefer the opposite — having skis that all feel similar). Paired with the next ski, I could pick whether I want to mess around and try some tricks, or have a stable ski that lets me ski hard in any conditions. I think that’d be pretty fun.

Ski #2: Everyday Resort Ski — Nordica Enforcer Free 104, 186 cm + Salomon STH2 13

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This ski isn’t as playful or as easy to flick around as the Ranger 102 FR, but since I have the SFB in this quiver, I think the Enforcer 104 makes more sense. It’s much, much more damp and stable than the SFB, while still being fairly easy to pivot and ski centered. This is the ski I’d break out when conditions are getting nasty, while the SFB would be on my feet when conditions are slightly to very soft.

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Ski #1: Do-Everything Touring Ski — Line Vision 108, 183 cm + Fritschi Tecton 12

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I don’t think I’m changing from my first 2-ski quiver. While I don’t know how durable the Vision 108 is (since I just started skiing it last year), I have yet to destroy any of my touring skis, so I’m not too worried about it. In the backcountry, I’m rarely subjecting my skis to harsh impacts, and while I’ve skied over plenty of rocks in my time, I usually do that pretty slowly. More importantly, I just always feel comfortable on this ski, and that’s what I’d want out of my do-everything touring ski.

Ski #2: Do-Everything Resort Ski — Fischer Ranger 102 FR, 184 cm + Salomon STH2 13

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Ugh, I really wanted to go with a more “exciting” ski here, but like the Vision 108, I’m just very comfortable on the Ranger 102 FR. It’s not the most playful ski, nor the most stable, but it combines those two things quite well. While I’d be wishing for a wider ski on extremely deep days, I’m still going to have a good time on the Ranger 102 if conditions are really that epic. As for durability, all I can say is that we’ve been skiing on the Ranger 102 FR for two full seasons now, and have no issues to report.

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

So many skis!

Apart from the skis that I did include in some of my 2-ski quivers, the ones that were most difficult to leave off were the Rossignol Black Ops 118, Moment Deathwish, Moment Wildcat & Wildcat 108, J Skis Masterblaster, Line Outline, Volkl Revolt 121, ON3P Woodsman 108, Folsom Blister Pro 104, Line Sakana, Nordica Enforcer 110, Dynastar Menace Proto, Liberty Origin 96, Liberty Origin 106, and Salomon MTN Explore 95.

The fat pow skis there just don’t make sense for me in a 2-ski quiver, since I’d want a bit more versatility than they can offer. I almost chose the Black Ops 118 for my 2-ski, resort-only quiver, but the Nomad 105 is just more sensible.

The Masterblaster is a phenomenal ski, but as I keep pushing myself in terms of spins and flips, I’m finding that I’m slowly leaning more and more toward the playfulness end of the “playfulness vs. stability” spectrum on which I judge most skis.

The Moment Deathwish and Moment Wildcat 108 have been really fun so far, but as someone who loves to carve (including smaller turns), I think their sidecut radii might be just a tad too long for me. That said, I think the Deathwish has a very good chance of unseating at least one of the skis here once I get more time on it.

The Woodsman 108 is a blast to ski, but for me and these 2-ski quivers, slightly narrower, less rockered skis make just a bit more sense.

The Folsom Blister Pro 104 got left off simply because I want a more playful ski for a daily driver.

I almost picked the Enforcer 110 (which was in many of my quivers last year) for my “minimal touring 2-ski quiver,” but the Enforcer 104 is better on firm snow and I’d have the SFB in that quiver for when conditions are soft.

The Liberty Origin 96 and Origin 106 are extremely versatile skis, but in my quivers, I’m opting for skis that are either a bit more playful or a bit more stable.

The Line Sakana is an incredibly fun ski, but it’s also a pretty niche ski.

And then the Salomon MTN Explore 95 is excellent for steep spring lines, but I much prefer the Vision 108 when the snow is soft, and the Vision 108 will still get me down some burly lines.

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

Probably the Moment Deathwish. As I’ve said before, I’ve loved that ski so far, and really look forward to spending more time on it. Same goes for the Moment Wildcat 108.

If I end up really liking the ON3P Woodsman 108 on firm days in Crested Butte’s steeps, that ski has a great chance of replacing the Ranger 102 FR or Enforcer 104 in some of my 2-ski quivers.

The Prior Northwest 110’s tune felt a bit off when we skied it last spring, but I liked everything else about it. So if a re-tune makes that ski feel looser than it was last spring, it seems like a very good candidate for my wider resort ski.

Then I’m also super excited to get on the Shaggy’s Ahmeek 105, which seems like it’d fit most of my criteria for a versatile resort ski (heavy, lots of rocker, progressive mount point).

VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

I’d be pretty happy with a lot of brands, so here are some of my favorites:

Moment

50/50 2-ski quiver: Deathwish Tour, 184 cm + Deathwish, 184 cm

Resort-Only 2-ski quiver: Commander 98, 178 cm + Deathwish, 184 cm

No complaints here. I think I’d be pretty happy skiing the Deathwish as a daily driver in the resort, and it’s light and playful enough that I’d be comfortable opting for the more directional Commander 98 in my resort-only quiver.

Line

50/50 2-ski quiver: Vision 108, 183 cm + Sick Day 104, 186 cm

Resort-Only 2-ski quiver: Sick Day 104, 186 cm + Outline, 186 cm

Again, pretty happy here. For my 50/50 quiver, I’d want something a bit less directional than the SD 104, but that ski is just so good. And I’d be super happy with that resort-only quiver.

Prior

50/50 2-ski quiver: Northwest 100, 184 cm (Hybrid Rocker + XTC construction) + Northwest 110, 190 cm (Hybrid Rocker + fiberglass construction)

Resort-Only 2-ski quiver: Northwest 100, 184 cm + CBC, 188 cm (both w/ Hybrid Rocker & fiberglass construction)

I really like all of these skis, and can’t think of any conditions where I’d feel out of place with these quivers. For my resort-only quiver, I think I might have Prior make the Northwest 100 a bit heavier for a more damp feel on firm days.

Liberty

50/50 2-ski quiver: Origin 96, 182 cm + Origin 106, 187 cm

Resort-Only 2-ski quiver: Origin 96, 187 cm + Origin Pro, 192 cm

I love Liberty’s Origin series. They’re all really versatile skis, and they’re all directional but still quite playful. I think the only issue I see here is that the Origin 96 is a bit heavy for a dedicated touring ski, but I think I could adjust.

Armada

50/50 2-ski quiver: Tracer 108, 180 cm + ARV 106, 188 cm

Resort-Only 2-ski quiver: ARV 96, 184 cm + ARV 116 JJ, 185 cm

Only small issue I have with this quiver is the Tracer 108 — it’s a very versatile and intuitive ski, but I wish it was a bit more freestyle-friendly and lighter for long days in the backcountry. Other than that, pretty content here. I’d opt for the non-Ti versions of the ARV 96 and ARV 106 because I want something a bit more playful and am willing to give up the slightly better suspension of the Ti versions.

Icelantic

50/50 2-ski quiver: Nomad 105 Lite, 181 cm + Nomad 105, 191 cm

Resort-Only 2-ski quiver: Nomad 95, 181 cm + Nomad 115, 191 cm

I really like the Nomad series, and while I haven’t tried the Nomad 95 or Nomad 105 Lite, I don’t see any big issues there. The Nomad 105 Lite is a bit heavy for a dedicated touring ski and the 181 cm Nomad 95 might not be quite as strong as I’d like, but I think those would be minor problems, if anything.

Kristin Sinnott

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

80% of my skiing is done in Northern New Mexico and is primarily resort focused. So for my 2-ski quiver, I’m including one dedicated alpine ski and one touring setup with robust AT bindings — a setup that won’t be too heavy for skinning up a mountain but also not so light that I feel uncomfortable at higher speeds in the resort.

Ski #1: Nordica Santa Ana 93, 169 cm + Marker Griffon or Tyrolia AAAttack2 11

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Nothing new here — still looking forward to skiing these back east and everywhere else. Every time I took them out last season they were a pleasure to ski and I’m hoping they don’t let me down this year. From smooth, steep chalk to day-old powder to chewed-up corduroy, the Santa Ana 93 handled it well and was a blast to ski.

Ski #2: DPS Alchemist Zelda 106 C2, 171 cm + Marker Kingpin or Salomon Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Of the 100-110mm-wide skis I’ve used, the Zeldas tend to fall into the middle ground as they don’t have the widest (or narrowest) shovels, they’re not the lightest (or heaviest), and they don’t have the most (or least) tail taper. I’ve found them to be a versatile ski that can handle most conditions and for my 2-ski quiver they would also serve as my powder and touring ski.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

The only thing I would change would be the bindings on the Zeldas. I’d throw some alpine bindings on them and call it good.

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I’m pretty happy with my choices and this might be a result of already taking into consideration my holiday plans to ski back east. If I had future travel plans to Hokkaido or BC, then I might regret my lack of a really fat ski, but as it stands, big trips don’t seem to be in my near future.

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

The DPS Alchemist Uschi 94 C2 would be missed, especially on days where all I want to do is lap West Basin’s steep, tight chutes.

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

I think the Nordica Santa Ana 100, Moment Sierra, and Line Pandora 94 & 104 all have a chance of making the cut for my quiver. My go-to ski was once the Pandora 110, but alas, I haven’t yet had a chance to ski the latest versions.

VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

I’m still sticking with DPS. I’d opt for the Zelda 106 and either the Uschi A94, or if I wanted something that could handle more turn shapes, maybe the Yvette 100RP.

Nordica would also be a good option at this point with the Santa Ana 93 and Santa Ana 100 or 110. All in the 169 cm length.

Sam Shaheen

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

Ahhhh, 2 skis. Now we’re really getting into it. This one is pretty tough (although, reverse-spoiler-alert, I committed to this quiver a month ago on GEAR:30), but I think I’ve got a quiver here that I could be very happy with in everything from the gnarliest mountaineering lines to hammering resort laps, and everything in between.

As I’ve said in the previous quiver pieces, I split my time pretty evenly between the resort and the backcountry. Of that time, about half of my backcountry skiing is hitting bigger, steep lines in the spring. Almost all of my resort skiing happens in cold, dry Colorado.

Ski #1: Mountaineering / Low-Snow Touring Ski — Salomon MTN Explore 95, 184 cm + ATK Raider 2.0 12

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This ski is really good. It would basically only get taken out for big missions and dry days mid-winter, but when I’m waking up at 2 am for a 10-hour day, I want this ski on my feet. And those are the best days

Ski #2: Everyday Touring & Resort Ski — Blizzard Rustler 11, 188 cm + Salomon Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This setup would get about 70% of my days in this quiver. The Rustler 11 is a great ski that, to put it vaguely, is equal parts business and pleasure. It’s playful and quick enough to bounce around the resort and happily slash / pop / slarve my way around the mountain. At the same time, it’s a pretty directional ski that can be driven hard to get through days when conditions aren’t great. For its weight, it’s one of the more playful skis that retains good enough suspension for me to feel comfortable mobbing in a variety of snow conditions. It would get a lot of time in and out of the resort.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I think I would probably go with a 177 cm Volkl Mantra M5 and a 184 cm Moment Wildcat. The 184 cm Wildcat / 188 cm Rustler 11 decision is really a toss-up and I would be very happy with either ski — I can ski both of them in very similar ways (see below for more on that decision).

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I don’t think I’d change my quiver at all to maximize durability or versatility. I’m very confident in both of these skis and would be very happy with them everywhere except the US East Coast (or other areas that see a lot of super-firm conditions). I’d just have to keep the Rustler’s razor-sharp.

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

The Wildcat could easily replace the Rustler 11. I chose the Rustler 11 because it’s more directional and a bit more damp. A 2-ski quiver is all business; there’s a lot less room for playful skis here, at least for me. Skiing is super, super serious business. The Rustler 11 will be able to handle crappy snow a hair better than the Wildcat. And that’s what made the final decision.

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

I think the Moment Deathwish could make the cut here. I’m really curious about that ski. I think it could replace the Rustler 11.

VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

I think I could go with either Salomon or Blizzard, but there would be serious compromises with each.

Salomon: MTN Explore 95 (Raider), QST 106 (Shift)

The QST 106 is a great ski but it’s a bit heavy and not quite as wide as I would want for powder touring

Blizzard: Zero G 95 (Raider), Rustler 11 (Shift)

I haven’t skied the Zero G 95, but I have reason to believe that it won’t quite have the suspension of the MTN Explore 95 and it is likely more demanding — which is probably ok for much of the mountaineering I do.

Kara Williard

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

Ski #1: Everyday Resort Ski — Nordica Santa Ana 100, 177 cm + Look Pivot 14

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I am really refusing to budge here. As I have repeated, almost incessantly, this is the daily driver for me. It offers such a great blend of stability, playfulness, and energy. I can trust this ski for 90% of inbounds conditions at Taos, and it meets every need when conditions are everything from firm, chalky, unpredictable, or slushy. I will continuously stick by this ski, since it provides just enough dampness and smoothness without being overly demanding in tighter areas or when I’m not charging.

Ski #2- Playful Powder / Touring Ski — K2 Mindbender 106c Alliance, 175 cm + Salomon Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I’ve been impressed by the versatility of this ski, and find it to be a good balance of playful, nimble, with enough flotation for powder days, while also not being excessively heavy for touring. It may not float quite as well as much wider skis but it is plenty for most powder days, while still serving as a playful and fun ski around the resort in other conditions. Likewise, it is light enough to tour with, while also being stable enough for a variety of backcountry and resort conditions, from crust to crud.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Since my quiver is already resort-oriented with just a bit of crossover for touring, it doesn’t change, other than putting an alpine binding on the Mindbender 106c.

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I am inclined to stick to Nordica, but the only ski I have spent an obscene amount of ski days on (including lots of rocks and low-snow conditions) is the Blizzard Bonafide. I have been tremendously impressed by how durable Blizzard skis are, while still being versatile. So I’d opt for the 173 cm Bonafide for daily resort us and opt for the 172 cm Sheeva 11 as my playful pow ski and touring option. Again, this isn’t anything against the quiver I picked above, but is based on the experience I had on my Blizzard’s when I was skiing more rocks than snow. With over 300 days on that ski, it’s held up quite well and is very versatile. I am a Southwest girl who goes nuts on relatively “shall0w” 8-12” powder days, so I can imagine that my quiver could switch to both softer and wider skis if I were to step off the chalky steeps of Taos Ski Valley and into some really deep and heavy PNW conditions. But even with that said, I think this quiver would serve me well wherever I went.

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

Based on what I said above, I was close to exchanging the Santa Ana 100 for the Blizzard Bonafide. I also fiddled around a lot with my 2nd ski choice, and considered going wider. I was close to putting down the Sheeva 11, and realized that this had basically been my 2-ski quiver choice for the last two years (I’ve since been able to get on a lot of other skis). But I realized that scaling back the waist width of that second ski opens up a lot of versatility both in resort and backcountry, and I was consistently stoked on how well the K2 Mindbender 106c did in a wide spectrum of terrain and conditions.

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

It seems impossible that anything would ever get me off the Santa Ana 100 or Blizzard Bonafide daily-driver trend, but I am eager to spend some time on the 170 cm Volkl Secret or the Volkl Mantra M5 if the Secret doesn’t offer the stiffness and stability I like from my daily resort ski.

VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

Based on the durability / versatility question, I think I’d opt for Blizzard.

The Bonafide and Sheeva 11 combo is an excellent duo of a hard-charging, stiff, and stable option that’s paired with a much more playful, maneuverable, wider ski that’s still light enough for touring. The Sheeva 11 is a bit wide for the second ski, so I would also be into a Nordica pairing of the Santa Ana 100 and Enforcer Free 104 with touring binding. Lastly, this is mostly conjecture because I barely skied a couple runs on the Mindbender 99Ti, but based on my brief interaction, I think that ski + the women’s Mindbender 106c would be a great 2-ski quiver.

Cy Whitling

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

Ski #1: Moment Deathwish, 184 cm + inserts for Shift and Look Pivot

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Now, I’m sort of cheating with the inserts, but it’s technically still just one pair of skis. The Deathwish would still be my go-to inbounds ski, but I’d like the opportunity to throw burly touring bindings on it for those days when I go really looking for trouble. The Deathwish Tour is freaking awesome, but there are still booter and cliff days when I don’t want to be on a ski quite that light, just because I’m worried I’d break it (I crash hard, into hard things, pretty often). And I really like having a binding like the Shift that I trust to release in those scenarios. Yes, I could totally just ski the Deathwish inbounds with Shift, too (spoiler for my one ski quiver) but why not have some alpine binders on there for the majority of my time on this setup? As for the CAST system, I just prefer the quicker transitions on the Shift and the fact that I don’t need to keep track of multiple pieces. 

Ski #2: Moment Deathwish Tour, 184 cm + Fritschi Vipec Evo

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I walk uphill a lot. This setup is really good for walking uphill and skiing back down.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Ugh. what a terrible question. What a sad concept. I’d stick with the Deathwish + Pivots, and snag a pair of the Sego blades. Then I’d wax them with my tears as I imagined never earning another turn.

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Cy Whitling's custom-painted Moment "Deathfish"
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I’d still go with the Deathwish and the Deathwish Tour. My first pair of the Deathwish (see above) was bought used, I ran them hard for three years (like, really hard), and then I lent them to a kid who, unbeknownst to me, went and (poorly) hit a bunch of rails on them, and beat up the sidewalls. Then I epoxied the sidewalls and skied them another year before I retired them (and gave them a custom top sheet…). But I loved them too much, so I took them out of retirement. And then I got a new pair, so I retired them again, but I realized I wanted to tour on them, so I drilled another set of holes in them, and toured on them for a few months before I finally retired them for reals this time. So yeah, I feel confident in Moment’s durability.

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

I do really like having a fat, light, stupid pow ski in the garage. So the Atomic Bent Chetler 120 would be missed.

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

If somebody can make an ~1800-gram ski that does everything better than the Deathwish Tour and works for my skiing style, I might be interested. But as of right now, I think that’s pretty unlikely.

VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

Moment (see above quivers).

Sascha Anastas

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

Ski #1: All-Mountain Resort Ski — Liberty Genesis 96, 165 cm + Marker Griffon

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

With only two skis in my quiver, I think I would opt for a more playful all-mountain ski than I did with my 3-ski quiver. I think the Liberty Genesis 96 is more playful than the K2 Mindbender 98Ti, especially in the moguls, yet the Genesis 96 is still pretty stiff underfoot so I had no problem getting the ski to make precise and quick turns on steeper terrain — and they’re a blast to carve on groomers. This ski does handle quite well for its width in somewhat deep powder and choppier conditions so, I feel like I would be well prepared to handle most inbound/ resort conditions on the Genesis 96.

Ski #2- 50/50 Ski — Armada Trace 108, 164 cm + Marker Kingpin 10

I had a really hard time choosing between the Trace 108 and the Line Pandora 104. The Trace 108 is pretty light, which, combined with a touring binding like the Kingpin 10, makes for a pretty solid (albeit wider) backcountry setup that is also a great ski for sidecountry / hike-to terrain. I also feel like this ski would be able to adequately handle most wet / heavy powder conditions, yet when I skied this ski on groomers in the resort, it was damp and responsive (for its weight), which I would think would make it a good ski for more technical backcountry lines.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I think I would probably change my second ski to the Line Pandora 104. The tradeoff would be that, on those really heavy powder days, I’d have a slightly narrower ski. But since I am not very heavy, I am usually able to stay afloat, even on narrower “pow” skis like the Pandora 104.

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I wish I had a crystal ball to answer this question. I think I’d go with the Liberty Genesis 96 or the Nordica Santa Ana 93 for my all-mountain ski and the Line Pandora 104 for a wider 50/50 skis since those are some of the most versatile skis I have skied in the past few years.

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

As mentioned above and as always when I leave it off my list — the Line Pandora 104.

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

Again, I think I would say the Nordica Santa Ana 93, Line Pandora 94, or Santa Ana 100. The Santa Ana 100 for the same reasons I would imagine this ski would make my 3-quiver list in that is was deemed by both Kara and Kristin a really stable and accessible all-mountain ski. But it was hard for me to choose a 100mm-wide ski as I think that I would want something just slightly narrower for an everyday resort ski. With that said, it is too narrow and probably too heavy for me to use as my 50/50 ski. I think the Santa Ana 93 could be a great all-mountain resort ski and would give the Genesis 96 some strong competition.

Eric Freson

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

I more often than not ski in the backcountry, so my two choices will reflect lots of days spent walking. As we drop to two skis, this becomes a problem for me with bindings, more so than skis. The Salomon Shift does offer a bit of a cheater option, but I’m still going to need two pairs of boots. The 2-ski scenario also begins to expose just how specialized many of the pieces of equipment we use are, and how intended use plays a huge factor in gear selection.

Ski #1: Do-Everything Ski — 4FRNT Raven, 190 cm + Salomon Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This continues to be a setup I can trust anywhere I might find myself. The Raven is quite light for its size, predictable on firm snow, and loose in soft snow. In a 2-ski quiver, I would move up to the 190 cm length over the 184 cm in an effort to create more stability at higher speeds and on the firmer snow often encountered at a resort. The increased weight and overall dimensions would be less ideal in the backcountry, and the lighter weight and ample rocker take away confidence compared to other potential choices at the resort, but it’s going to get the job done just about anywhere.

The Salomon Shift would similarly be a great compromise for a ski used everywhere. I would much prefer the Shift over a traditional tech binding or something like the Kingpin at the resort in firm conditions, and the increased confidence inbounds would be worth the weight and transition compromises in the backcountry. The Shift really does open up a lot of opportunities to use a single ski everywhere.

Ski #2: Pow Ski — 16/17 4FRNT Renegade, 191 cm + Salomon Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

While I haven’t yet skied the new, current Renegade, I have skied or owned the 4FRNT Renegade in all its various iterations since its inaugural release and I still haven’t found anything to displace the Renegade as my go-to “soft snow, big days” ski. I also prefer the older / stiffer Renegades to the more recent and softer flex pattern of the 18/19 version, so I’m excited to try out the 19/20 ski.

At 122 mm underfoot, I will never feel short-changed on deep days, but with a stiff flex pattern both underfoot and torsionally, I have skied Renegades in some truly heinous conditions without too much drama, either. It’s quick to get on top of the snow, very easy to pivot, and you can shut it down in a moment. Similarly to the Raven, I would bump up to the 191 cm version over the 184 cm version to give me an increased speed limit and more confidence inbounds.

Pairing the Renegade with a binding like the Salmon Shift really does feel like what this binding was intended for. The Renegade is a soft-snow tool, and not something you are as likely to use for super long backcountry days, or hardpack-resort-hucking. Excluding such instances from what the Shift is likely to see, you aren’t pushing the boundaries of what it was designed for, and wind up with something that feels like much less of a compromise.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Ski #1: Mellow Resort Ski — Whatever skinny ski Jonathan makes me try… + Salomon STH2 16

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

But really, I’d probably choose the J Skis Masterblaster in a 187 cm length. It’s fun, easy going, and something very different than what I normally spend my time on. Skiing at the resort doesn’t always need to be about murdering moguls and babies, and a ski like the Masterblaster is a great reminder of that fact. For those days when I’m tired, beat up, or just cruising with friends, I’d want to have something that didn’t require 100% of my attention / wasn’t trying to kill me with speed at all times.

As far as bindings, I like stiff springs, good power transfer, a damp ride, and I don’t like feeling the elasticity / heel rotation of Look Pivots. Salomon bindings have served me well for many years, and are what I would use for my resort ski.

Ski #2: Angry Resort Ski — Blizzard Bodacious, 186 cm + Salomon STH2 16

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

When the snow is soft, the speeds are high, and the terrain is gnarly, the Blizzard Bodacious is what I’m going to reach for almost every single time at a resort. A good example of getting it right the first time, the Bodacious is currently back in its original shape and construction, and that’s a very, very good thing. No speed limit, heavy, damp, and fast.

At Crested Butte I’d choose the 186 cm length over the 196 cm for its ability to fit into smaller places and function more effectively at slower speeds. But don’t be fooled, this is a very heavy, stiff, and demanding ski, but if you haven’t been skipping leg day and would like to feel like a wrecking ball, I think it’s hard to have more fun at a resort when conditions are soft and you want to keep your skis pointed down the fall line.

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Assuming my location is somewhere in the western states, it would be the same as my current selection. Over the years, I have had exceptionally few issues with my 4FRNT skis. I’d have no second thoughts about trusting them to hold up for the next three years.

I am a bit more skeptical about the Shift binding holding up to a lot of resort abuse over a period of three years, but there is only one way to find out! Hardpack hammering is hard on any binding, and I have broken more than a few over the years in this manner. But with the extensive materials design as well as the engineering surrounding its use that went into the Shift, I’d be willing to give them the benefit of the doubt, and simultaneously not feel like I was asking too much from them to hold up to three years of mixed backcountry and resort duty.

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

For a 2-ski quiver, I put a lot of thought into the idea of one backcountry ski, and one resort ski. The idea of having a simple and lightweight backcountry binding and a beefy resort binding on my skis has a lot of appeal. Ultimately, I decided I would prefer to have the versatility to match snow conditions regardless of where I’m skiing, rather than having the “perfect” setup 60% of the time. Situations where I don’t have the right ski for the day would create more anxiety than not having the ideal binding.

But two skis that were at the forefront of my mind in a one-backcountry-setup scenario were the Volkl BMT 109 and the Faction Prime 4.0. Both are relatively light, powerful, directional skis. Both are different in character than the 4FRNT skis I selected, but they do a good job of spanning a very wide range of conditions, and do so with little drama. In a 1-ski scenario, nothing is worse than having a specialized ski that is sketchy when used outside its intended use. The BMT 109 and Prime 4.0 may not be as nice on the up as the Raven or stay as loose in pow as the Renegade, but I could grab either one on any day of the season and never wonder if I was going to be in over my head.

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

The Atomic Backland 107 is a ski I’d like to spend time on this season. I’d be very interested to see how it does as an everyday or 90% backcountry setup. Its low weight and progressive flex pattern seem like they could make it a great choice as a versatile soft-conditions backcountry ski, to the point where it might proverbially “punch above its weight” in soft snow, negating the need for a larger and more pow-specific ski for all but the biggest days. Those, conveniently, are the same days where you often find yourself at the resort since avy conditions spike in uncontrolled areas. If the Backland 107 is robust enough to handle firmer or windblown conditions when things were more locked up, it could make for a 2-ski-quiver scenario where I would feel more comfortable about having a single backcountry setup to make room for a dedicated resort ski.

VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

Ride or die… 4FRNT would continue to be my go-to brand for a ski quiver of two. Between the MSP 99, Raven, MSP 107, Hoji, and Renegade, two of the five would make up my quiver. It would depend a bit on where I live and what sort of terrain I had access to, but in Crested Butte, where backcountry skiing is primarily long tours or sled-accessed, it would continue to be the Raven and the Renegade.

Paul Forward

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

Ski #1: DPS Alchemist Lotus 124 + Salomon STH2 16 or Marker Jester

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I need a fat ski for work and 95% of the time, this one does what I need it to. As I’ve said many times, it’s as close to a 1-ski quiver for an Alaskan heli-ski guide as I’ve found. Yes, I miss fatter skis some days and it’s a bit bigger than I usually want for lift-served pow, but when I’m standing on something really big and am feeling scared, I usually take a little solace in the fact that these skis are on my feet.

Ski #2: DPS Alchemist Wailer 106 + Fritschi Tecton (or maybe Salomon Shift MNC)

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

These skis are light enough to tour on and do okay in pow, but unlike many skis in this category, they’re capable of hooking up into a powerful, carved turn on groomers. I have a pair of the 19/20 version ready to go but can’t yet comment on their performance. My biggest complaint on the 18/19 version is that the mount point feels a little far back, making the ski a bit less playful and a bit tougher to work in more technical terrain, so I’m looking forward to playing around with the mount point on the new ski.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister Gear Review's 3-Ski Quiver awards

Ski touring and backcountry skiing in general has been my priority for well over twenty years and it’s hard to imagine not doing it (it’s much easier to imagine a year without lift-served skiing). That said, for my two-ski quiver for Alyeska, I think I’d be happy with the 184 cm Volkl Mantra M5 for firm snow and variable conditions and then the old, heavy 190 cm Moment Blister Pro for any time it’s soft out there.

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections
Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I think I’d stick with the DPS skis mentioned above. Other than some early- and late-season tom-foolery and the occasional foray into lower snowpacks while guiding, I’m lucky to live in a place with a fat snowpack where rocks aren’t often an issue. That said, I’ve hit a lot of rocks with the Lotus A124’s and have yet to have any real issues.

If I knew I was going somewhere less likely to be powdery on a regular basis, I’d swap out the Lotus A124 for something like the Moment Blister Pro.

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

It’s hard to imagine not having a lightweight touring ski (e.g., Black Diamond Helio 116) to pair up with lightweight 2-buckle touring boots. Similarly, I’d be sad to abandon a skinny, metal-laminated resort ski.

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

I’m not sure what to expect from the Blizzard Zero G 105, but it could be a good alternative to the Wailer A106. I’m always keen to try new powder skis and the more I get to ride each year (with a few exceptions), the better. I’m always looking for a ski that could unseat the Lotus A124.

VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

DPS (see above).

Joey Teahan

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

The 2-ski-quiver setup works pretty great for me, since the only time I’m out of the park is after a bad fall and I decide to limp around groomers for a while, or on a powder day when the cliffs and pillows around the mountain take the place of man-made jibs.

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

My 2-ski quiver for my home mountain (Eldora) is pretty straightforward. For park, groomers, and any fresh snow 3 inches or less, my all-time favorite ski is the 179 cm Line Tom Wallisch Pro.

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Whenever there’s enough fresh-fallen joy that the park is no fun and the back bowls are calling, I really like the Faction Candide 4.0 for anything from a light dusting to relatively deep powder (my 3-ski quiver would include something more heavily rockered for those rare days that pack your esophagus with fluff).

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

My backcountry touring setup only comes into play when I have a quiver of 4 skis or more. What can I say, I like a good ski lift…

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I would still stay with the Tom Wallisch Pro for my first choice. They’re incredibly durable for normal use, and the only time they didn’t hold up was after doing some sketchy doubles with my DIN at 16.

As for my more powder-oriented ski, I would stray away from the Candide series. At least for the versions from the past few years (they moved factories for 19/20), the bases seem thin and the core prone to wearing out over time. My Candide 3.0 is noticeably softer after a solid season of riding and the base is barely keeping water out of the core due to all the base welding I’ve had to do.

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I haven’t been on a ton of recent pow skis but I owned the old, heavy Atomic Bent Chetler for a long time, and was impressed by its durability. Amazing ski with a rocker profile that makes it super fun for deep-snow slashes, its offers enough width for bigger drops, and the small amount of additional weight (vs. the Candide 4.0) would be well worth it, knowing that they might actually last through three years of abuse.

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

Line Chronic — fun ski, though very similar to the TW Pro, and I prefer the TW Pro

J Skis AllPlay — Just a fantastic one-ski-quiver ski

Faction Candide 3.0 (18/19) — Also a great all-round ski, but not my favorite for park or powder

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

The Armada BDOG that I’m currently riding has a lot of things I like and I’m excited to try some of Armada’s models to see if they might bump the TW Pro out of my 2-ski quiver.

VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

Line. Before Blister, I was riding mostly Line skis, and I’ve been pretty impressed by every pair I’ve used. That being said, Line’s durability is sometimes lacking, particularly for skis that I’m constantly bashing into rails. J Skis would be a close second because many of their skis share a lot in common with many of my favorite Line skis (no surprise there, given that J started Line), but are more durable in my experience.

Jonathan Ellsworth

I. What’s your 2-ski quiver for where you ski most?

For Crested Butte and the Gunnison Valley, I’d go:

Ski #1: J Skis Masterblaster, 181 cm + Look Pivot 14

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

This ski has shown up in a number of my other quivers, because of

(1) Its all-around versatility — this is one of my favorite skis for everything from soft groomers (it’s not amazing on bulletproof groomers); very firm to super-soft hero moguls; off-piste anything; and (if you’ve read my full review) you know that I even had a good time on this ski on some much-deeper-than-I-expected days.

(2) Its very good damping. The ski feels plush.

Ski #2: Salomon QST 106, 188 cm + Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

When we’ve got about 6” inches of new snow, there will be a bit of a question whether to opt for the Masterblaster or the QST 106. But anything over 6 inches, and I’ll likely reach for the QST 106, and I’ll also roll with this ski for the deepest days in CB. (Yes, a ~118mm-wide ski will be more ideal on those days, but we’re making some compromises here, and I still regard the QST 106 as a good deep-snow ski.)

This definitely won’t be the world’s lightest touring setup, but I’ll live with that, and my tours don’t tend to have super long approaches and I’m rarely touring with skin-track speed demons. I’ll take my time on the way up, and then I will really, really enjoy the way down.

II. If you didn’t do any backcountry touring, what would your 2-ski quiver be for inbounds-only skiing?

Ski #1: J Skis Masterblaster, 181 cm + Pivot 14

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

And the firmer the conditions / the longer we’re going between storms, the more I’d make sure to keep the edges sharp.

Ski #2: ON3P Woodsman 108, 187 cm + Pivot 14

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I’m mostly thinking of this ski as a stronger, more playful QST 106. And I think it will be every single bit as good (and probably better) in terms of flotation than the QST 106 for the deep days.

III. What’s your 2-ski quiver for the next 3 years, regardless of location?

Ski #1: J Skis Masterblaster, 181 cm + Look Pivot 14s

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

Ski #2: Salomon QST 106, 188 cm + Shift MNC

Blister's 2019-2020 Reviewer Quiver Selections

I mean, it’s not that I’m so completely head-over-heels in love with the QST 106 … it’s just that the ski is so good and so versatile in so many situations … I can’t figure out what clearly deserves to go here instead? And ultimately, as we narrow these quivers, I just want to make sure that any time, anywhere, I’m on a setup that is going to range from “fine” to “outstanding” for the conditions. And that’s how I feel about the QST 106. (And, FWIW, it’s also how I feel about the new 181 cm QST 99.)

And who knows — when it comes to ski quivers … maybe that is the definition of being head-over-heels in love?

IV. What skis were most difficult to leave off your list?

Line Sick Day 104, 186 cm and Line Sick Day 114, 190 cm + Shift MNC

The Sick Day 104 is such a good ski, and I could happily use it as my all-the-time touring setup. And if the snow is the least bit soft or slushy, it is an incredibly fun inbounds ski. But for firm conditions, I personally like a heavier ski that provides really good damping. And that is not where the Sick Day 104 shines, but still … I feel guilty not finding a spot for it in my quiver.

And I actually had penciled in the Sick Day 114 for my 2nd ski — it certainly would make the deeper days even more fun … but that QST 106 offers just a bit more versatility outside of deep snow.

V. What ski do you imagine has the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski it, or get to ski it more?

#1: 186 cm Folsom Blister Pro 104

I do really wonder whether I’ll feel like the Folsom Blister Pro will work well enough at Crested Butte on firm snow (i.e., carve well on really firm groomers, and offer outstanding suspension in fully messed-up off-piste conditions) to make it my narrowest ski in a 2-ski quiver. It might. And we’ll be finding out in less than a week.

#2: 184 cm Kaestle MX 99

We just got this ski, and let’s just say that you can consider me curious. (For all the reasons that I’m curious about the Folsom Blister Pro 104.)

#3: 190 cm Moment Deathwish

I can’t say that this ski has the “greatest likelihood” to make my list, but it is a ski that I am eager to get on. I’ve only skied the 184 cm Deathwish, and that was about 50 years ago, and it wasn’t in the current construction.

VI. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 2-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

Salomon QST 99, 181 cm + STH2 binding

Salomon QST 106, 188 cm + Shift binding

It was pretty tempting here to go with a combo of the 180 cm Blizzard Brahma and 188 cm Blizzard Rustler 11 … and depending on the locations or the particular season or my mood … this could be a fine way to go. So my decision to go with the QST skis is clearly doubling down on having 2 skis that will really have me covered well in conditions that range in the middle of the conditions spectrum, as opposed to venturing out toward the narrower and wider ends of the spectrum (where the Brahma and Rustler 11 would make more sense).

There are lots of ways to skin that poor proverbial cat, that’s for sure.

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19 comments on “2-Ski Quivers: Reviewers’ Selections (19/20)”

  1. Great opinions and back up logic for anyone West of Denver but nothing here for us east coast skiers so meh to this article and the altitude biased opinions expressed in it.

    • These are REVIEWERS PERSONAL CHOICES, not recommended quivers or something like that. As mentioned in the intro, the Buyers Guide has several quivers, split into high and low snow areas.

      Furthermore, if you become a member, you can ask for a suggestion tailored to your needs.

  2. Y’all need a Tahoe based reviewer. For the larger quivers it doesn’t matter as much but once the quivers get down to 2, a lot of your preferences are for skis that tend not to do well in west coast conditions.

  3. Two skis, now we’re getting more realistic! This is great stuff especially since I’m trying to figure out for myself what works best. So, a couple questions:
    1. How do you chose which resort ski to take out on a given day?
    2. Do you go with mount point options for the resort ski? If so, spend the extra cash on demo bindings or inserts?
    These are definitely western biased because that’s where the reviewers are located. Maybe an east coast or midwestern skier will get hired soon for better perspective there. Skiessentials.com has lots of east coast skier info and blogs.

  4. I would like to see a picture of Cy Whitling’s Deathwish. Now that is a heart felt love story. I also welcome a book or podcast or a movie about it.

      • I had to do some hammering and sidewall epoxying on one of my Bodaciouses after slamming them into some rocks and denting an edge badly enough to delam the sidewall a bit. It’s been like that for a couple of years now, and is holding up just fine.

    • That story is made even cooler by the fact that Cy did a custom paint-job on that Deathwish, now calling it the “Deathfish.” Just added a pic of it.

  5. Hm, two is not enough, I think a touring ski (mid-fat instead of two on both ends of the spectrum), a heavy resort powder ski and a slope ski is the minimum.

    I would go Line Vision 108 with a Tecton and a Völkl Revolt 121 with Shift. And stay at home when its icy.

    Others?

  6. Hey I will be road trip pow chasing for 2 weeks in CO and hopefully some touring. I have MTN explore 95 with rotation 2.0 and Solly QST 99 188 for inbounds. Different boots for both. I can only bring 2 pairs of skis. i am wondering if I should get something wider? maybe put inserts in the 99 for easy binding switches and then bring something wider? last trip the snow was so deep in the resorts i never went touring. but i was also stuck without a car. travelling solo also limits touring options. i dont own wider skis and live in the east so they would only be for trips.

  7. 50yo Tahoe resort cruiser quiver over here: Blizzard Rustler 10 180cm (look pivot) and Rossignol Super 7 (look pivot).

    Maximum amount of fun in all conditions, minimum amount of work…

  8. I just got 2 new pairs and I don’t replace skis often. Resort only. 6′ 3″ 195

    Nordica Enforcer 93 185 cm for no new snow. Picked this over the 88 because even with no new snow, I’m always poking around in the trees looking for leftovers, so I figured the wider ski would better when I find it, without being so wide that it’s sluggish in bumps.

    Nordica Enforcer 104 Free 186 cm for new snow. It’ll float well enough, and pivot and slide in narrow chutes and the trees. As it doesn’t take long to need an edge as the day gets on and the snow gets tracked out, I wanted something that could still carve.

    Psyched to try them both.

    • Mr. Whitling, that is flat awesome ! were you pretty sure it would work ? or was it, “can’t really eff em up much more than they are…” ?

      • Ha, both…

        I’m pretty comfortable modifying my equipment, be that with paint, the drill, or a jig saw, and at that point I’d already retired and resurrected them so many times that I decided if it really made them unskiable then I’d finally really have an excuse to mount them on the wall forever.

        And this weekend the saga almost continued, I needed a rock touring ski and got millimeters away from putting a fourth mount, for Shift on my ancient Deathwishes.

        What’s that Game of Thrones saying? What is dead may never die!

  9. The day I skied on the shift the first time I almost immediately changed my equipment. Sold everything so make my life more simple..

    My 2 ski quiver:
    Salomon QST 99 (188cm) + Salomon Shift: For touring and all-day resort
    Atomic Bent Chetler 120 (192cm) + Atomic Shift: When it gets deeper

    Boot:
    Tecnica Cochise DYN

    I can’t feel a different between my Pivot 14 and the shift, so I also mounted a shift on my BC just to save some weight and have the possibility to do a quick resort hike if I see a nice line.

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